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Movable Point Frog by classictrains Movable Point Frog by classictrains
For reliability and safety and speed, switch frogs on heavily trafficked lines have moved away from the passive variety to a kind which supports the wheel continuously on the rolling surface. This is from the Union Pacific main west of Chicago.

For the more typical low speed frog see :iconhunter1828: at [link]
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:iconfactorone33:
factorone33 Featured By Owner May 13, 2008  Professional Photographer
There's a few of these on the UP transcon north of Lawrence. Slick things for sure.
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:iconcoshipi:
coshipi Featured By Owner May 7, 2008
Text book picture! Excellent shot!

British railways (no longer British Railways!) could do with learning a thing or two about good engineering. I've never seen one of these - I'm pretty sure we simply don't have them here. Trains always slow down anywhere where there are turnouts - not always all that much, with predictable results in terms of wear and tear.
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:iconclassictrains:
classictrains Featured By Owner May 7, 2008
What is intriguing about these systems is that they also include heaters and hot air blowers to keep the flangeways and moving parts clear of ice and snow. Mechanically these things are monsters.

Good to hear from you again!
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:iconcoshipi:
coshipi Featured By Owner May 7, 2008
I'm familiar with heaters and hot air blowers - for the main blades. They were installing them in the early 1970s while I was doing a temporary contract with British Rail, in 1972-3. But a movable point frog - yup, you can see they're monsters. But a really good idea for main lines. The passive ones are okay for sidings, or in stations where trains are pootling along slowly.
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:iconookami-oni:
Ookami-Oni Featured By Owner May 5, 2008
They definitely look interesting. Can't say I've seen one of them before.
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:iconclassictrains:
classictrains Featured By Owner May 5, 2008
The UP has them all over!
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:iconookami-oni:
Ookami-Oni Featured By Owner May 6, 2008
Well then I'll just have to look harder
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:iconherrdrayer:
HerrDrayer Featured By Owner May 5, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
I haven't seen any switches that I would characterize as tongue and groove in Heidelberg, but the tram switches around here are pretty interesting. I'll post some pictures of them this week if I can get out to photograph them. The motormen control them with buttons on their control console, and electromagnets under the cab actuate the throw. The switches are also completely run-through safe, so a trailing point move requires no action on the motorman's part.
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:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner May 4, 2008  Student Photographer
I've read about them, but I've never seen one life before. Thanks!
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:iconsidecarcycle:
SIDECARCYCLE Featured By Owner May 4, 2008
I've never seen one in service but remember seeing in Trains maybe 10 years ago that this design was undergoing testing at the "Test track" at Pueblo, Colorado. Reminds me of the Tongue and Groove switch design used in street railways in the early part of the last century. Do you have any pic's of Tongue and Grooves, Chris?
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:iconclassictrains:
classictrains Featured By Owner May 4, 2008
LOL... I'm an old fart... but not quite that old. Actually I recall seeing them in Pittsburgh but I wasn't shooting detail then. They reminded me of the stub switches often used on narrow gauge lines.
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:iconsidecarcycle:
SIDECARCYCLE Featured By Owner May 10, 2008
I used to have a pair of Tongue and Groove switch castings years ago, sold them though.
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:iconclassictrains:
classictrains Featured By Owner May 10, 2008
musta weighed a ton!
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:iconlabrat-78:
labrat-78 Featured By Owner May 4, 2008   Photographer
They need the same kind of switch machine that the points use. They are usually wired together, like a crossover. We don't have any here although in a few spots they would prove worth their while simply for the tonnage they can handle.
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:iconclassictrains:
classictrains Featured By Owner May 5, 2008
I couldn't believe the warning labels all over the mechanicals. Reading between the lines it must be hypothetically possible to manually throw the frog without throwing the normal points... YIKES!
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:iconlabrat-78:
labrat-78 Featured By Owner May 5, 2008   Photographer
If I remember correctly it requires taking both the switch points and frog in "hand Throw" and restoring power when the entire movement is complete.
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:iconcrazydelmar:
CrazyDelmar Featured By Owner May 4, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
I don't believe I have ever come across anything like that
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:iconhunter1828:
hunter1828 Featured By Owner May 4, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
Without that type of system, high-speed switches would be almost impossible.
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