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December 29, 2007
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German Commuter Service by classictrains German Commuter Service by classictrains
So you thought Push-Pull commuter service was an American thing? Not at all.

Posted in honor of Hoyt's :iconherrdrayer: imminent return to Europe.

Some details courtesy of :iconzcochrane:

This cab car is known as BDnf 738 or BDnrzf 739. The BDnrzf 739 ones and 29 of the BDnf 738 had their cab removed completely, with practically all of the others converted to either the "Karlsruhe head" [link] or, later, to the newer "Wittenberge head" [link] (named after the towns where the cars were converted). There were a total of 269 cab cars with doors at the end. Because some cars that never had a cab were also rebuilt to cab cars with newer heads, there are a total of 381 cab cars without such doors built, though I don't know how many of them are still in service.

More info in Wikipedia
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:iconshenanigan87:
shenanigan87 Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
Ah yes, very interesting, and one of my favourite type of car ^^ Though this cab was extremely unpopular as the engineer had to sit in a cramped little compartment, earning nicknames like engineer's toilet :) Its still nice to see these cars in their original sliver colour, not the bright red of a typical regional train nowadays.
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:iconclassictrains:
classictrains Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2008
These are just like the cabs on the CTA El.
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:iconshenanigan87:
shenanigan87 Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
After looking up what CTA El acutally means, I must agree ^^ Looks very much like an NY subway as well. But in a regional train service, there's no real need to keep the crossing in the front of cab cars, as the trains are always made up of about 5 cars and never coupled or uncoupled during their daily routes.
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:iconpromus-kaa:
Promus-Kaa Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
I love European trains...the buffers on the front are a MUST for a train to look cool!! :nod:
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:iconeisenmann87:
Eisenmann87 Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2007  Hobbyist Photographer
WOW, this looks strange. O_o
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:iconclassictrains:
classictrains Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2007
I was hoping someone could fill in some details. I have no idea what it was.
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:iconeisenmann87:
Eisenmann87 Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2007  Hobbyist Photographer
Maybe a prototype? I couldn't find any information about it. I seems, that you photographed a real curiosity.
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:iconclassictrains:
classictrains Featured By Owner Dec 31, 2007
Interesting. Thanks very much for checking.
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:iconzcochrane:
ZCochrane Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2008  Student Photographer
Actually, that style was rather common once. However, it has poor visibility and little room to work for the engineer, so all units have been rebuilt to have full-width cabs these days.

Of course, many cab cars are also normal cars rebuilt and never had this "Führerklo" (engineers toilet).
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:iconherrdrayer:
HerrDrayer Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2007  Hobbyist Photographer
Actually, push pull service is quite common there. Oftentimes the cab cars afford the engineer more creature comforts than the locomotives... Compare the visibility of this cab car:
[link]
to the visibility of the locomotive on the same train...
[link]
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